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Our Safety Signs meet the AS 1319-1994 Australian Standards.

If you need a safety sign right now!, Savvy Signs offer a number of safety signs designed for temporary use - signs you can download and print right now and use until you can obtain permanent signs. These safety signs are in PDF format you can print from your desk. They are professionally designed to demand attention. Use these safety signs as needed to help protect your employees – and your business.

Bookmark this page as we are working on adding more printable safety signs soon!

Why Have Safety Signs?

Following is an extract from the WorkSafe Compliance Code document titled Communicating Occupational Health and Safety Across Languages.

A safety sign is one which gives a specific message to those who may be exposed to hazards in the work environment. Signs may be used to prevent accidents, signify health hazards, indicate the location of safety and fire protection equipment or give guidance and instruction in an emergency.

While clear symbols can aid understanding, the effectiveness of a sign system can be undermined by linguistic and cultural differences and an inability to understand terminology. Risks can arise when employees who are not familiar with the meaning of a symbol or image or cannot read a sign, misinterpret the sign’s meaning. Therefore, education and training are an essential part of any sign system. Employees need to be taught the meaning and intention of signs and their understanding of that meaning has to be checked.

Remember that safety signs do not replace or reduce the need for proper and ongoing prevention measures.

Employers need to use safety signs in a form which can be understood by all employees. Safety signs need to:

Ensure that employees are taught the meaning of all signs during the induction process – training needs to include temporary (ie maintenance, cleaning) and permanent signs.

Where there is a major language group in the workplace and written signs are used, they need to be in bilingual form. (See worksafe.vic.gov.au for some translated examples of common health and safety signs.) When more than two languages are required, it is best to use picture-only signs to avoid confusion.

If written signs are used, it is better to pick one form of sign and phrasing and use it consistently.

Another option may be to provide translations of all signs in a handbook or a separate notice prominently displayed in the workplace.

Safety Signs

A safety sign is one which gives a specific message to those who may be exposed to hazards in the work environment. They may be to prevent accidents, signify health hazards, indicate the location of safety and fire protection equipment, or for giving guidance and instruction in an emergency.

The most effective signs are clear and consistent, and use diagrams and simple language. Where there is a major language group other than English in the workplace, signs should be in bilingual form.

The meaning of all signs should be taught during induction, but the provision of safety signs does not replace or reduce the need for proper, ongoing prevention measures.

Where should you place your sign?

In locations where lighting is good and a sign is mounted in a reasonably prominent position, it is recommended that any symbols be at least 15mm per metre of viewing distance, and any uppercase text be at least 5mm per metre of viewing distance. This should be increased by at least 50% for poor lighting or viewing conditions. Where practical, signs should be mounted close to the observer's line of sight in the vertical plane.

Signs should be located against a contrasting background, and such that the possibility of it becoming obscured by stacked materials or other visual obstructions is minimised.

For maximum effectiveness, signs should be maintained in good condition, kept clean and well illuminated.

Reference: WorkSafe Victoria Laws and Regulations. In Victoria, workplace health and safety is governed by a system of laws, regulations and compliance codes which set out the responsibilities of employers and workers to ensure that safety is maintained at work.

Australian Standards

The Australian Standard covering safety signs is AS1319-1994. This standard sets out requirements for the design and use of safety signs intended for use in the occupational environment. The aim is to regulate and control safety related behaviour, to warn of hazards and to provide emergency information, including fire protection information. It specifies several sign classifications and layouts as follow.

AS1319 does not specify a required material or nominal size for a sign, but does stress that the type of sign used should be suitable for the intended application, and that employees should be informed of their purpose.

In locations where lighting is good and a sign is mounted in a reasonably prominent position, it is recommended that any symbols be at least 15mm per metre of viewing distance, and any uppercase text be at least 5mm per metre of viewing distance. This should be increased by at least 50% for poor lighting or viewing conditions. Where practical, signs should be mounted close to the observer’s line of sight in the vertical plane.

Signs should be located against a contrasting background, and such that the possibility of it becoming obscured by stacked materials or other visual obstructions is minimized.

For maximum effectiveness, signs should be maintained in good condition, kept clean and well illuminated.

WorkSafe Victoria

Laws and regulations
In Victoria, workplace health and safety is governed by a system of laws, regulations and compliance codes which set out the responsibilities of employers and workers to ensure that safety is maintained at work.